name
         
Email: office@wri.ie   
 
yellowhammer
 Wildlife Events Autumn 2016

 3 Courses & 1 Lecture

 

Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland hosted 4 events in Autumn 2016

There was something to suit eveyone with an interest in wildlife, regardless of their level of experience

Click on the TABS above for event details

 

1. IWRC Pain & Wound Management Course
(specifically for individuals who have completed the IWRC Basic Wildlife Rehabilitation Course, or experienced wildlife rehabilitators - 11 credits)

2. IWRC Basic Wildife Rehabilitation Course
(open attendance, introduction to wildlife rehabilitation and first aid - 22 credits)

3. WRI Advanced Wildlife Treatment Course - Veterinary
(specifically for veterinary surgeons and veterinary nurses - 11 credits)

4. Lecture on Lead Toxicity in Wildlife
(open attendance - 2.5 credits)

 

All of the events were accredited by the Veterinary Council of Ireland

 

 

kind contribution from

logo


 

Programme  
Instructor  


International Wildlife Rehabilitation Council’s
Pain & Wound Management Course

This Pain & Wound Management Course is designed to give wildlife rehabilitators and veterinary professionals a working knowledge of the vocabulary and concepts underlying the modern approach to pain and wound management in mammalian and avian species

 

Recommended for:
Individuals who have completed the IWRC Basic Wildlife Rehabilitation Course, or experienced wildlife rehabilitators

Date: Saturday 24th September 2016 (ONE DAY)

Venue: Ashbourne Community School , Ashbourne, Co Meath

Credits: accredited by the Veterinary Council of Ireland for 11 CVE credits


Programme

08.30

Registration & Coffee

09.00

physiology and clinical signs of pain
supportive care techniques drug therapy including indications, contraindications and side effects
a systematic review of the physiology and treatment of the most common types of soft-tissue wounds seen in injured mammalian and avian species

12.00

Lunch
13.00

Skills and practical sessions;
wound assessment
wound types
antibiotic therapy
15.00

Coffee
15.20 - 17.30 Skills and practical sessions;
cleaning and topical agents
bandaging techniques
physiology and stages of wound healing

 


Instructor

Lynn Miller B.Sc.Ag., Dipl. Ecotox., PhD, CWR – Director Emeritus

Lynn Miller Lynn began life in New Zealand surrounded by animals; cats, dogs, chickens, horses, budgies, etc. But it was her passion for wildlife and conservation that lead to Summer School at Jersey Wildlife Preservation Trust and a stint at London Zoo. A rather lovely holiday in France led to meeting a gorgeous French Canadian chap and a new life in Quebec. While attending McGill University’s MacDonald College, Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, near Montreal, she began working with birds of prey at the Macdonald Raptor Research Centre. Of course, although the fact that raptors were the specialty did not deter the many people who bought in ducklings, song birds, herons and pigeons.  

In 1994 Lynn co-founded Le Nichoir. She qualified as an International Wildlife Rehabilitation Council (IWRC) instructor many years ago and subsequently joined the IWRC board, and in 2011, become president of IWRC. She also is a Certified Wildlife Rehabilitator (CWR). The classes Lynn teaches have allowed her to travel widely throughout North America and Mexico, Ireland and South Africa.

Lynn has continued her education with a PhD in Environmental Toxicology and continues research into the impact of oil in birds, especially the northern gannets that migrate south to Florida and the Gulf of Mexico through her research position in the Chemistry department at Concordia University. She has been the position of Director of Wildlife Rehabilitation for the Cape Wildlife Center in Barnstable, Massachusetts for four years now. Although based there, she continues her research at Concordia University, and returns regularly to visit Le Nichoir.

 

 

International Wildlife Rehabilitation Council’s
Basic Wildlife Rehabilitation Course

The Basic Wildlife Rehabilitation Course is a comprehensive introductory course in wildlife rehabilitation.  Lecture topics include: introduction to wildlife rehabilitation; anatomy and physiology; calculating fluid requirements; handling and physical restraint; thermoregulation; stress; basic shock cycle; initial care and physical examination; nutrition and associated diseases; standards for housing; zoonoses; euthanasia criteria and release criteria.
Practical topics include: gavage; physical restraint; injections; physical examinations; weighing and limb immobilisation.

 

IWRC eagle

 

Recommended for:
Open attendance, introduction to wildlife rehabilitation and first aid

Date: Saturday 8th & Sunday 9th October 2016 (TWO DAYS)

Venue: Ashbourne Community School , Ashbourne, Co Meath

Credits: accredited by the Veterinary Council of Ireland for 22 CVE credits

 

 

 

 

Programme  
Instructors  


Wildlife Rehabilitation Ireland’s
Advanced Wildlife Treatment Course

This Advanced Wildlife Treatment Course is designed to give veterinary professionals an in-depth knowledge of the modern approaches to mammalian and avian wildlife treatment options after first aid and stabilisation has been achieved

 

Recommended for:
Veterinary surgeons and veterinary nurses

Date: Sunday 25th September 2016 (ONE DAY)

Venue: Ashbourne Community School , Ashbourne, Co Meath

Credits: accredited by the Veterinary Council of Ireland for 11 CVE credits


Programme

08.30

Registration & Coffee

09.00

Veterinary legal and ethical obligations
Rehabilitator responsibilities
History
Clinical examination
Diagnostics
Basic treatments
Common conditions; waterbirds, raptors, passerines, mammals
Fracture management
Hospitalisation considerations
Postoperative management
Case studies

12.00

Lunch
13.00

Skills and practical sessions;
Capture, Handling, Restraint
Physical examination
Triage, Stabilisation
Diagnostics, Sampling
15.00

Coffee
15.20 - 17.30

Skills and practical sessions;
Euthanasia
Pathology
Case studies

 


Instructors

David Couper, MRCVS

David has been the wildlife veterinary officer at the RSPCA's West Hatch Wildlife Centre in Somerset for the past 13 years, where he mainly works with native wildlife. David also works with companion animals in the Domestic Centre which deals with Inspectorate-generated animals - cruelty cases, abandonments etc.
David graduated from Glasgow in 1996 and worked in mixed practice for about 5 years, and did an MSc in Wild Animal Health at the Royal Veterinary College / Institute of Zoology.

David has been to Canada a couple of times to do voluntary work on a Swift Fox reintroduction program, and has written the fox and bat chapter, and co-authored the otter chapter, for the 2nd edition of the BSAVA Manual of Wildlife Casualties.

 

Kieran Corry, MVB

Kieran

Kieran’s wildlife interest started at the age of 4 when he asked for a bird guide and a pair of binoculars for Christmas. As a profession he initially intended to become a marine mammal vet and did an externship with Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute in the USA which included a capture and health assessment of wild bottlenose dolphins. After realising that marine mammal veterinary meant either research or working at sea world, Kieran quickly changed his mind about this career idea.

After graduating with first class honours from University College Dublin in 2005 he worked in a busy large and small animal practice in County Tyrone.

 

During breaks from working in practice, Kieran did voluntary work with Amazon Community Animal Rescue, Education, and Safety in Peru, and Pilpintuwasi Wildlife Rescue - a wildlife rescue and temporary custody centre located on 20 hectares of land 20 minutes outside Iquitos, the largest city in the Peruvian Amazon. Pilpintuwasi is dedicated to protecting animals affected by the poaching and trafficking industry which thrives in Iquitos.

To pursue this interest in the small animal field, particularly orthopaedic and soft tissue surgery, he moved to Birmingham to work in a progressive small animal practice where he expanded his skills. After moving back to Ireland in 2010, Kieran wanted to work in a practice that offered the highest standard of equipment and an ethos for veterinary care that matched his own. To this end, he now commutes from Tyrone to work in Clontarf Veterinary Hospital in Dublin.

On return to practice he took on any wildlife cases that came his way and rehabilitated them himself but was limited due to lack of proper facilities until he met Dan Donoher from Kildare Animal Foundation (KAF). Kieran is now able to concentrate on the veterinary treatment of Irish wildlife and leave KAF and Hedgehog Rescue Dublin to do the rehabilitation.

His main wildlife workload involves surgical and medical treatment of traumatic injuries caused by humans.


Back to Top

 

 

 

Programme  
Lecturer  


Lynn Miller’s
Lead Toxicity in Wildlife Lecture

Wildlife casualties caused by lead toxicosis are a common occurrence impacting a wide range of species.
Lead, a heavy metal, has no known role in any required biological process.
That means there is no safe level of lead in a body, its impact can range from subtle shifts in fitness to death.

Recommended for:
Open to the general public and anyone with an interest in this topic. However it is focused on providing information to veterinary professionals admitting patients with lead toxicosis, and wildlife rehabilitators who provide the follow up supportive treatment.

Date: Saturday 24th September 2016

Venue: Pillo Hotel, Ashbourne, Co Meath

Credits: accredited by the Veterinary Council of Ireland for 2.5 CVE credits

Programme

19.00 - 21.30

The potential sources of lead
Biological impacts
Testing for lead
When to treat or species thresholds
Treatment options
Supportive care
and what the face of lead toxicosis looks like in a case study
Questions & Answers session


 


Lecturer

Lynn Miller B.Sc.Ag., Dipl. Ecotox., PhD, CWR – Director Emeritus

Lynn Miller Lynn began life in New Zealand surrounded by animals; cats, dogs, chickens, horses, budgies, etc. But it was her passion for wildlife and conservation that lead to Summer School at Jersey Wildlife Preservation Trust and a stint at London Zoo. A rather lovely holiday in France led to meeting a gorgeous French Canadian chap and a new life in Quebec. While attending McGill University’s MacDonald College, Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, near Montreal, she began working with birds of prey at the Macdonald Raptor Research Centre. Of course, although the fact that raptors were the specialty did not deter the many people who bought in ducklings, song birds, herons and pigeons.  

In 1994 Lynn co-founded Le Nichoir. She qualified as an International Wildlife Rehabilitation Council (IWRC) instructor many years ago and subsequently joined the IWRC board, and in 2011, become president of IWRC. She also is a Certified Wildlife Rehabilitator (CWR). The classes Lynn teaches have allowed her to travel widely throughout North America and Mexico, Ireland and South Africa.

Lynn has continued her education with a PhD in Environmental Toxicology and continues research into the impact of oil in birds, especially the northern gannets that migrate south to Florida and the Gulf of Mexico through her research position in the Chemistry department at Concordia University. She has been the position of Director of Wildlife Rehabilitation for the Cape Wildlife Center in Barnstable, Massachusetts for four years now. Although based there, she continues her research at Concordia University, and returns regularly to visit Le Nichoir.

 

 

 

 

 

 

donate

Wildlife Courses

IWRC logo

 

Join our Mailing List

mailing list icon

 

Wildlife Crime Info

Conferences

 

mailing list icon